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Strong communication skills lead to career success and faster integration in the community. It’s a good thing that learning opportunities for learning English (and French) abound for newcomers to Manitoba.  Learn all about the many language programs offered here.


Quick Facts

  • Canada has two official languages – English and French.
  • The Citizenship Act requires that new citizens to Canada have the equivalent of Level 4 for Speaking and Listening in English or French using the Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadien (NCLC).
  • There is a variety of language classes offered by the Government of Canada that cater to the different needs and abilities of newcomers.

Language Training Articles by Topic

Language Training Resources

Learn how job-ready English can take you places in Manitoba’s job market. Listed here are links to resources on language proficiency and language courses in English and French for immigrants.

To understand Canada’s Official Languages Act, read “Improving your English and French”.

If you don’t know your Canadian Language Benchmark, you can go to WELARC (Winnipeg), Westman Immigrant Centre (Brandon) or SEELS (Steinbach). These agencies will also refer you to the appropriate language centres for the courses that you need.

Watch Nick Noorani’s inspiring story in “My home my native land” and learn what it takes to be a successful immigrant:

Here’s a description of language classes funded by the Government of Canada and how you can register for them.

Some suggested language courses for immigrants:

  1. English Online’s Live and Learn for flexible and self-directed English lessons.
  2. YMCA-YWCA of Winnipeg’s English as a Second Language Course also provides child-minding so that mothers can attend class.
  3. Mosaic Newcomer Family Resource Network provides language training and social networking for newcomer parents.
  4. The University of Winnipeg’s English for Specific Purposes Program (ESP) focuses on communication in specific disciplines.
  5. Red River College’s English for Specific Purposes is for those who want to pursue training opportunities or work in specific occupations.
  6. You can learn English used in the workplace at the Enhanced English Skills for Employment Program.
  7. The University of St. Boniface has various levels of French language programs for Manitoban immigrants.
  8. The University College of the North in Thompson, MB offers general language training and services for refugees.
  9. Thompson Newcomer Settlement Services does referrals to EAL classes aside from a host of newcomer services.

If you prefer English language courses offered by private institutions, you can try HeartLand International English School or the Applied Linguistics Center.

The University of Manitoba has an Intensive English Program (IEP) which offers high quality instruction in a vibrant campus atmosphere, while Alliance Francaise has various types of French courses from beginner to advanced level.

Newest Language Training Articles

Improve your reading comprehension in 5 steps

Person reading a book

A big part of learning English is reading. Reading improves our vocabulary and helps us get used to sentence patterns…. Read more »

5 practical techniques to improve your listening skills

A man with his hand to his ear

Have you noticed that you can find many tips on improving your speaking, reading and writing skills but not a… Read more »

5 more activities to help you write well in English

person writing on a notebook

Whether it’s an email, cover letter, report, or an essay that you wish to write well, here are a few… Read more »

5 tips to prepare for an IELTS exam

Man smiling and showing IELTS scores

Taking the test? Whether it is IELTS academic or general training, it’s an exam that requires some preparation. Not that… Read more »

Recent Language Training Articles, CLB3-4

Improve your reading comprehension in 5 steps

Person reading a book

A big part of learning English is reading. Reading improves our vocabulary and helps us get used to sentence patterns…. Read more »

5 practical techniques to improve your listening skills

A man with his hand to his ear

Have you noticed that you can find many tips on improving your speaking, reading and writing skills but not a… Read more »

5 more activities to help you write well in English

person writing on a notebook

Whether it’s an email, cover letter, report, or an essay that you wish to write well, here are a few… Read more »

5 tips to prepare for an IELTS exam

Man smiling and showing IELTS scores

Taking the test? Whether it is IELTS academic or general training, it’s an exam that requires some preparation. Not that… Read more »

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Study the power point to get to know this week’s idioms. New year’s resolutions idioms2.docx from English Online Inc.

“Could”, “should” or “would?”

“I think they could help you.” “Don’t you think they should help your friends?” “I would help you if I… Read more »

“There”, “Their”, or “They’re”?

“I put your book over there.” “Their toys are all over the floor.” “She thinks they’re going to be very… Read more »

Is it “me” or “I?”

Do you see a difference between “My sister and I went to the store,” and “She gave it to me”?… Read more »

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